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Fig. 4 | Radiation Oncology

Fig. 4

From: Is pulmonary artery a dose-limiting organ at risk in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy?

Fig. 4

Four patients with high grade of pulmonary artery (PA) invasion and high PA V40-55 values had short overall survival (OS). Dose volume histograms (DVH) of PA (azure) and PTV (blue), as well as isodose curves of 40 Gy (red), 45 Gy (yellow), 50 Gy (green), 55 Gy (orange), and 60 Gy (purple) in axial, sagittal, and coronal views are shown. PA V40-60 was the percentage of PA volume of PA that received 40-60 Gy. a A patient who was diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (T4N3M0 and PA invasion grade 3) died of massive bleeding approximately 6 months after radiotherapy. PA V40, V45, V50, V55, and V60 were 90%, 89.02%, 86.89%, 81.03%, and 56.81%, respectively. b A patient who was diagnosed with NSCLC (T2N2M0 and PA invasion grade 1) survived 9.9 months after radiotherapy. PA V40, V45, V50, V55, and V60 were 87.46%, 80.09%, 72.36%, 66.31%, and 61.19%, respectively. c A patient who was diagnosed with NSCLC (T3N0M0 and PA invasion grade 2) survived 8.7 months after radiotherapy. PA V40, V45, V50, V55, and V60 were 81.28%, 69.78%, 55.03%, 33.2%, and 22.72%, respectively. d A Patient who was diagnosed with NSCLC (T4N1M0 and PA invasion grade 3) survived 5.5 months after radiotherapy. PA V40, V45, V50, V55, and V60 were 97.81%, 94.12%, 87.83%, 79.45%, and 64.06%, respectively

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